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  1. page Leading Practices by Organization edited ... Kazakhstan Institute of Directors (KID) Strengthening Awareness of Corporate Governance and F…
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    Kazakhstan Institute of Directors (KID)
    Strengthening Awareness of Corporate Governance and Financial Markets
    Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM)
    Building Local Voices for Reform

    Kyrgyz Stock Exchange Press Club (KSEPC)
    Press Sessions- 2011 Contest 3rd Place
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    1:46 pm
  2. page Legislative and Regulatory Reform edited ... Adopting the policy paper and translating the recommendations into plans of action by all part…
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    Adopting the policy paper and translating the recommendations into plans of action by all parties can be a challenge. However, good advocacy campaigning and putting follow-up mechanisms in place can make it a little easier.
    KAM
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    of Manufacturers (KAM)
    Building Local Voices for Reform
    The problem:
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  3. page Legislative and Regulatory Reform edited ... As a local NGO, it can be difficult to persuade the executive and legislative bodies to work t…
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    As a local NGO, it can be difficult to persuade the executive and legislative bodies to work together with other stakeholders on a project but with clear objectives, good planning, and consensus building the objectives can be met.
    Adopting the policy paper and translating the recommendations into plans of action by all parties can be a challenge. However, good advocacy campaigning and putting follow-up mechanisms in place can make it a little easier.
    KAM
    Kenya Association of Manufacturers
    Building Local Voices for Reform
    The problem:
    Business associations at the sub-national level did not have the right advocacy skills and never spoke in one voice on issues that affected businesses at the regional level. In light of this, the government never took the business representatives seriously.
    The practice:
    KAM identified 37 business coalitions in the 6 regions of the country (Nyanza & Western, Coast, Eldoret, Nakuru, Athi-River & Thika) and supported the coalitions to establish a platform of engaging the Government under the regional business Agenda (RBA).
    With an aim of developing policy advocacy capacity in the regions, KAM organized two days of advocacy workshops in Mombasa and Nakuru. The advocacy workshops targeted BMO’s representatives taking part in the RBA process from Mombasa, Nakuru, Eldoret and Kisumu. About 156 Members of key business associations were trained in advocacy skills. During the workshop the areas covered included:
    Role of BMO’s in a Democratic Society & Tools for Effective Advocacy.
    Components of Effective advocacy- Research and Knowledge Assembly and Communication.
    Brief on the National Business Agenda and Prime Minister’s Roundtable in Kenya
    Advocacy and coalition building exercises.
    The coalitions identified a total of 32 priority issues that affected businesses within the respective regions, conducted research on the issues and made recommendations. Thereafter, 20 roundtable sessions were held across the country between business and government agencies to address the issues that businesses had raised concerns on. Finally commitment from the government was secured and a total of 1,000 regional business agenda booklets were published highlighting the issues of concern to businesses in the respective regions and the government commitment to finding solutions.
    Why KAM developed this practice:
    KAM had formerly concentrated its advocacy efforts on the National level at the expenses of the sub-national level, which never had elections to appoint the regional chairman. With this need in mind, KAM established 6 regional offices and created platform legitimacy for our regional offices to advocate effectively at the grassroots level.
    With KAM regional chapters having democratic legitimacy, there was a need to have effective advocacy coalitions to influence decision making at the grassroots level. KAM therefore initiated the regional business agenda that brought about business coalitions from the 6 regions to influence policy decision and thus create professional legitimacy.
    Steps or tips for implementing this practice:
    Identify credible business associations who have proper governance structures
    Develop policy and advocacy capacity of associations by conducting training sessions to provide requisite competence skills
    Establish Regional Advocacy Committees (RAC) made up of Executives from the participating business associations
    Establish Business Advocacy Committees (BAC) made up of chairs from participating business associations
    RAC researches identified issues and develops positions on each (issues are delegated to business associations)
    Communicate roundtable date to interested Government agencies
    BAC approves positions developed
    Hold a press conference discussing roundtable outcomes
    BAC and RAC meet to agree on plan to monitor implementation
    Publish Regional Business Agenda booklet capturing key issues identified, government commitments to resolving issues and the timelines agreed upon
    Stay engaged! Recognize organizations when commitments are met and follow-up when they are not
    Results:
    KAM was able to identify and build coalitions with 37 business associations across its 6 regional chapters. A total of 156 participants drawn from the participating coalitions were trained in advocacy skills.
    To further enhance advocacy efforts, KAM and two other civil society organizations conducted a local governance study in Kisumu, Nairobi, and Mombasa. The study, facilitated by Global Integrity and CIPE reviewed 177 indicators on local governance and was completed in November 2011, KAM held 3 roundtables with civil society and government to review the results of the study and to compile a series of recommendations for each of the city governments. The local governance study report dissemination in Nairobi, Mombasa & Kisumu was attended by a total of 118 participants. 1000 copies of the local governance study report were published
    The study identified a number of existing laws and their implementation gaps i.e. 25 gaps in Kisumu, 14 in Mombasa and 26 in Kisumu. As part of ongoing advocacy efforts, KAM and the business coalitions in the three cities will continue to raise awareness of the study and advocate for local governance reforms.
    With the publication of local governance report and devolution publication, the coalitions’ advocacy efforts became more professional & credible.
    Lessons learned and challenges faced:
    The advocacy initiative became more effective when the business associations started working together as a coalition thus creating legitimacy and earning respect from the government.
    A main challenge is that due to the bureaucratic nature of government, decisions were not made during the initial roundtable since the government representative had to go back and consult with the related ministry before a final decision could be made.
    Another major challenge was that initially some business associations never had any advocacy skills and therefore believed that advocacy is ‘shouting’ and ‘criticizing’ the government at all cost. This understandably instilled a defensive attitude from Government. After the participating associations attended training sessions, the associations as a coalition started working on the same page and engagements with the government became more constructive. The government started to openly consult the business coalitions on key policy changes.
    Coalition building achieved the numbers required to engage government agencies while the training of coalitions created professional legitimacy. In light of effective advocacy resulting in the creation of investment opportunities, the Coast parliamentary group awarded the local KAM chapter with a trophy.

    Comment here or visit the Discussion tab at the top of the page.
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  4. page Leading Practices by Organization edited ... Institute for Solidarity in Asia (ISA), Philippines The Performance Governance System Multi…
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    Institute for Solidarity in Asia (ISA), Philippines
    The Performance Governance System
    Multi-Sectoral Governance Councils
    Instituto Invertir, Peru
    EmprendeAhora- 2011 Contest Winner
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    7:28 am
  5. page Public Governance edited ... Public sector partners must choose their sectoral advisers wisely. Department heads and local …
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    Public sector partners must choose their sectoral advisers wisely. Department heads and local chief executives are encouraged to look beyond political affiliation. In fact, those institutions that are in more need of an image reversal should take risks, calling not only on those who are friendly to the cause, but on those that must be convinced to join their governance campaigns.
    Once the council is in place, the institution must do its best to exercise transparency and accountability, keeping in mind that the MSGC represents the interests of the people. Sectoral representatives must be invited to critique the institution's development plans.
    Results:
    The Philippine Military Academy (PMA) is currently undergoing a revival of its governance program under the watchful eyes of its Board of Visitors. The Philippine Navy Sail Plan 2020, PMA's strategy map, has raised up to 1 million pesos in funds through the Save your Navy Foundation and has survived uninterrupted under five (5) different Flag Officers. The Philippine Army has undergone a much needed media face-lift, thanks to the efforts of its Multi-Sector Advisory Board (MSAB), which is also currently raising funds for a good governance media campaign. The Army Transformation Roadmap has been adopted as an official transformation program by 4 Commanding Generals.
    Institutions like the Civil Service Commission, Department of Health, and Department of Public Works and Highways have likewise been putting up citizen governance councils in the hopes of eliciting civilian support for their governance programs. So far, their efforts have been received very well by the public.
    San Fernando Pampanga’s MSGC, which has undertaken a number of infrastructure restoration projects, has now evolved into the Center for Leadership Excellence and Responsibility (CLEAR), an office that will continue even after its founding political leaders have ended their terms. In Masbate, the City Advisory Board (CAB) has been given high-level access to records, documents, and proceedings, showing an increased level of transparency for the city.
    The following government institutions have MSGCs:
    Department of Health (DOH)
    Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH)
    Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD)
    Philippine Army
    Philippine Military Academy
    Philippine National Police
    Philippine Navy
    Iloilo City, Iloilo
    San Fernando City, Pampanga
    Balanga City, Bataan
    Masbate City, Masbate
    Naga City, Camarines Sur
    Dipolog City, Zamboanga del Norte
    Talisay City, Negros Occidental
    Tagbilaran City, Bohol
    Calbayog, Western Samar
    Lessons learned and challenges faced:
    The MSGC will only work for institutions that are open to genuine people participation. Government institutions on both the local and national levels should realize the importance of private sector support and strive to tighten their relationships with their communities. This is the only way governance can truly become a shared responsibility.
    The MSGC must in turn realize that they have the power to hold the government accountable. They should be ready to work for the common good and call out any form of corruption. In some cases, where the public sector institution’s governance program has slowed down, the MSGC should fight to keep it alive.
    Partners with more successful councils are really those that have taken risks in selecting expert, outspoken, sometimes high-profile leaders. Once they are won over to the cause of reform, they themselves spearhead the institution’s redemption, internally and externally.

    anchor2
    Admas Common Affairs Consultancy Association (Admas), Ethiopia
    (view changes)
    6:50 am

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