Recent Changes

Tuesday, October 23

  1. page Public Governance edited ... INVOLVEMENT OF INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDERS allows the PGS to continue despite changes i…
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    INVOLVEMENT OF INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDERS allows the PGS to continue despite changes in leadership. An effective office of strategy management ensures successful strategy implementation, while an active multi-sector governance coalition can demand for the continuation of the PGS as a framework that enables the organization’s responsiveness to its constituents.
    ORGANIZATIONAL ALIGNMENT is the key to successful strategy execution. No institution can succeed without ensuring that its members understand their roles in achieving the long-term Vision.
    ISA2
    Multi-Sector Governance Council
    The problem:
    The term limits of elected and appointed officials pose a challenge to continuity and progress in many governance situations. By involving sector representatives in the implementation of development plans by partners in the Performance Governance System, the strategy can be sustained regardless of any changes in leadership.
    The practice:
    Once public sector partners (national government agencies, professional associations, and local government units) have set up the initial governance documents, they select and invite representatives from different community sectors - business, media, academe, youth groups, church, civic groups, uniformed personnel, and professional organizations - to be part of their multi-sector governance council (MSGC). Upon formalizations, the MSGC acts as an advisory board that upholds and monitors the proper implementation of the partner's development programs and projects. Members of the MSGC meet regularly with the partners to track the progress of their initiatives and identify potential problems and recommend possible solutions. As 'co-owners' of the development strategy, the MSGC also takes concrete steps to significantly contribute to the implementation of partners' strategies such as promoting the initiative to their respective sectors, and mobilizing them to work with the partners as well in advancing the governance agenda.
    The expertise of the MSGC provides the partners a balanced mix of different perspectives, new insights and information, and creative ideas that will help sustain their development strategies. Moreover, they act as guardians of the strategy, keeping watch over transparency and accountability controls in the institution.
    Why and How ISA developed this practice:
    After two people power revolutions, we remain respectful of the lessons of history, aware that democracy is a necessary ingredient in the rise of nations. We have sought to bring leaders and citizens together from the very beginning, developing as part of our governance program, a mechanism that allows communities to participate in the creation of policies and programs that will transform lives. The MSGC is a governance mechanism that is driven by democracy. It encourages leaders and citizens to exchange ideas and determine sustainable solutions to critical issues, thereby making governance a shared responsibility.
    Steps or tips for implementing the practice:
    From the very beginning, we encourage our public sector partners to involve their stakeholders in the process of setting up long-term development plans. In this way, they are able to incorporate suggestions from the grassroots and build community ownership of development strategies.
    Later on, national government agencies (NGAs) and local government unites (LGUs) invite sectoral representatives to become part of the MSGC. These people are chosen for their commitment, expertise, and integrity. After an orientation on the demands of civic participation, candidates elect to become part of the council on a purely voluntary basis. The members of the MSGC then elect their officers and set up committees (finance, media, etc.) in support of the development strategy. In some cases, the MSGC is renamed as the institution sees fit.
    Public sector partners must choose their sectoral advisers wisely. Department heads and local chief executives are encouraged to look beyond political affiliation. In fact, those institutions that are in more need of an image reversal should take risks, calling not only on those who are friendly to the cause, but on those that must be convinced to join their governance campaigns.
    Once the council is in place, the institution must do its best to exercise transparency and accountability, keeping in mind that the MSGC represents the interests of the people. Sectoral representatives must be invited to critique the institution's development plans.

    anchor2
    Admas Common Affairs Consultancy Association (Admas), Ethiopia
    (view changes)
    1:59 pm
  2. page Leading Practices by Organization edited ... EmprendeAhora- 2011 Contest Winner Angel Investor Network Program Iraq 2020 Assembly Refor…
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    EmprendeAhora- 2011 Contest Winner
    Angel Investor Network Program
    Iraq 2020 Assembly
    Reforming the Corporate Registration Process

    Jos Business School, Nigeria
    Creating an Enabling Business Environment Through Legislation
    (view changes)
    12:16 pm
  3. page Legislative and Regulatory Reform edited ... The involvement of people and institutions from the beginning allowed the project to be implem…
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    The involvement of people and institutions from the beginning allowed the project to be implemented in a fragmented society such as Paraguay. While it took a while to reach consensus, projects such as this produce greater impact in the long term.
    To build strategic alliances between the private and public sectors and social organizations it is necessary to be aware that their dynamics are different. Understanding their respective logic is key to achieving consensus while giving greater stability to public policy. The Business Forum has acted accordingly, achieving consensus on transcendental issues for the country and installing them on public opinion.
    Iraq 2020
    Iraq 2020 Assembly
    Reforming Corporate Registration in Iraq
    The problem:
    For a company to register in Iraq, it would, on paper, take an average of 77 days and cost thousands of dollars. The opportunities for bureaucrats to delay paperwork, request extra documents, and demand bribes for each of the eleven steps are numerous.
    The practice:
    In order to provide a better environment for business, Iraq 2020 Assembly organized a series of workshops and discussions to evaluate the current registration process and develop recommendations for reform. After engaging a wide range of stakeholders representing business owners, government officials, and civil society, Iraq 2020 developed a policy paper which was then submitted to the secretary general of the Iraqi government. The policy paper calls for a revision of Corporate Law no. 21 of 1997 and the amendment of 2004 that establishes the procedures for corporate registration. In the way of streamlining the process, the paper recommends developing detailed instructions and guidelines to facilitate the process, institutional and individual capacity building of the Corporate Directorate to enforce the registration policies, and the adoption of an electronic registration system.
    How and Why the practice was developed:
    In a country where business owners in a recent CIPE survey listed corruption as their number one concern and the inconsistent application of rules and laws in the top three, a minimum of two months and thousands of dollars to register a company would likely be viewed as a "best case scenario." Therefore, Iraq 2020 Assembly felt that it was important to tackle this problem and build consensus to provide a better environment for business in Iraq. Achieving this goal will have a positive impact on economic progress and, eventually, the democratic process.
    Steps for implementing the practice:
    Organize two workshops with the goal of discussing the procedural and legal constraints of corporate registration.
    The first workshop was held in Iraq 2020 Assembly's headquarters to discuss all procedural steps, obstacles, constraints, administrative and technical shortages of the Corporate Directorate, and the sufferings of business owners. The purpose here was to lay out the problems and brainstorm ways they could be addressed
    The second workshop took place inside parliament with the participation of more than 20 parliamentarians from the economic, financial, and legal committees. During this discussion, participants reviewed Corporate Law no. 21 of 1997 and the 2004 amendment and contemplated new amendments to facilitate a better registration process.
    All stakeholders from the executive, legislative, and judicial bodies, business unions, local NGOs, international organizations and legal/economic experts participated in both workshops.
    With the input and consensus of all participants, develop a policy paper that outlines the findings and recommendations of the workshops. Present the paper to the responsible authorities during a press in the attendance of mass media representatives. This helps create awareness and accountability for the initiative.
    Organize follow-up workshops to discuss the procedural and legislative recommendations of the policy paper and develop a plan of implementation.
    Results:
    After delivery of the policy paper, Iraq 2020 Assembly met with the Minister of Trade and the chairman of the Economic Committee in parliament. Both supported the recommendations and workshops to develop working plans on legislative and procedural aspects. In April 2012, the team visited the Corporate Directorate and the economic committee to deliver a progress report that detailed the steps taken towards implementation of the work plan. At that point, activities to implement electronic documentation were underway, a new website with information about the process had been activated, and the Directorate displayed blueprints for a new and more accessible location. In addition, a letter from parliament had been sent to the Ministers Council requesting information about steps taken to develop a new draft of the corporate law.
    Lessons learned and challenges faced:
    Lack of coordination, ownership, vertical projects and exclusion of other stakeholders has undermined the efforts of many international organizations who worked with the Ministry of Trade over the last few years to improve the registration process; both in terms of cost and time.
    Building consensus over common goals and objectives with all stakeholders while initiating proper advocacy campaigns through local NGOs is the best possible way to achieve project objectives.
    As a local NGO, it can be difficult to persuade the executive and legislative bodies to work together with other stakeholders on a project but with clear objectives, good planning, and consensus building the objectives can be met.
    Adopting the policy paper and translating the recommendations into plans of action by all parties can be a challenge. However, good advocacy campaigning and putting follow-up mechanisms in place can make it a little easier.

    Comment here or visit the Discussion tab at the top of the page.
    [[include component="comments" page="Legislative and Regulatory Reform" limit="ALL"]]
    (view changes)
    12:13 pm

Monday, October 22

  1. page Leading Practices by Organization edited ... Center for the Implementation of Public Policies Promoting Equity and Growth (CIPPEC), Argenti…
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    Center for the Implementation of Public Policies Promoting Equity and Growth (CIPPEC), Argentina
    On-line Courses on Planning, Monitoring and Evaluating Research Impact on Public Policies
    Development in Democracy Foundation (DENDE), Paraguay
    ​Business Forums​

    Enugu Chamber of Commerce, Industry, Mines and Agriculture (ECCIMA), Nigeria
    Public Private Dialogue for Improved Business Environment
    (view changes)
    11:38 am
  2. page Legislative and Regulatory Reform edited ... Lessons from the experience: The practice we developed in 2010 is replicable in countries wh…
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    Lessons from the experience:
    The practice we developed in 2010 is replicable in countries where presidential contests are characterized by a reasonable level of civility. In Colombia, candidates in the ideological extremes can be convened to a civilized debate regarding specific public policy issues. In countries where that option is feasible, independent think tanks should venture into the practice, taking into consideration country specificities. The task is highly demanding from an organizational perspective, and bringing partners on board is a prerequisite. Needless to say, the political independence of the organizations involved is critical for the credibility of the exercise. To meaningfully influence policy, an integral part of the practice has to include fluent communication with senior personnel from the incoming administration. To that effect, the policy papers have to be prepared following “best practices”, including attention not only to “what” ought to be reformed, but more importantly to the “how” of the reform process.
    DENDE
    Development in Democracy Foundation (DENDE), Paraguay
    ​Business Forum
    The problem:
    In 2007, a group of business leaders saw the need to unify the private sector and reach consensus on the broad outlines that public policy should follow to ensure sustainable development within the country. As a result the Business Forum was born to provide a space for discussion and debate.
    The practice:
    The Business Forum brings together representatives from various business sectors to discuss central issues to the country. In these forums, national and international experts make presentations on the subject at hand and then open the discussion to plenary. In national forums participants craft a publication containing the private sector view on the measures necessary to achieve development. The findings are read to the public during a press conference in the presence of state officials, ambassadors, civil society, and multilateral organizations. The report is distributed among the participants, press, and all interested parties. Inter-institutional meetings are also held in order to establish partnerships aimed at treating current issues as well as forging agreement on a long term vision of development.
    Why and how DENDE developed the practice:
    DENDE’s mission is to design, influence and promote public policies that allow Paraguay to transit a process of sustainable development. Therefore, it seeks to promote projects that generate dialogue between different sectors (political, social and economic), knowledge sharing and citizenship building. In that sense, it has facilitated the Business Forum, which garnered the support of the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE) from 2008 to 2011, and has become a respected and credible space where entrepreneurs, association leaders, unions and Civil Society have sought consensus issues that will later constitute a single proposal for the national development agenda.
    Steps and tips for implementing the practice:
    Keeping in mind the fragmentation of Paraguayan society, DENDE delegated the responsibility for project management to an Executive Committee with autonomy and independence to set criteria and take action. This committee was representative and was able to gain the confidence and support of sectors traditionally divided by trade unions and sectoral issues. As such the committee succeeded in fostering trust and the ability to work together on issues of national significance.
    Outstanding professionals were commissioned to prepare working materials presented in thematic forums, which were later discussed in the Business Forums and other private sector meetings. The practice includes 3 thematic forums, 2 regional forums and 3 large national forums. The consensus proposals from each discussion were distributed via e-mail and given to the authorities and media. Also, a workshop was held to coordinate the different groups working on specific agendas. The discussions from the forums were also published as a set of two books.
    Results:
    On average 600 entrepreneurs from various sectors participated actively in the national forums with members of civil society, trade unions, and journalists.
    More than 120 people participated in the thematic and regional forums.
    Upwards of 50 unions and associations adhered to the proposals set out by the forums.
    Achieved consensus on the major issues presented including development, employment, infrastructure, fiscal policy.
    Invited by the President of the Republic to present proposals to the Cabinet in plenary
    Parliamentary approval of the Law on Concessions.
    Lessons learned:
    The involvement of people and institutions from the beginning allowed the project to be implemented in a fragmented society such as Paraguay. While it took a while to reach consensus, projects such as this produce greater impact in the long term.
    To build strategic alliances between the private and public sectors and social organizations it is necessary to be aware that their dynamics are different. Understanding their respective logic is key to achieving consensus while giving greater stability to public policy. The Business Forum has acted accordingly, achieving consensus on transcendental issues for the country and installing them on public opinion.

    Comment here or visit the Discussion tab at the top of the page.
    ...
    Reform" limit="ALL"]]
    (view changes)
    11:35 am

Friday, October 19

  1. page Leading Practices by Organization edited ... Bangladesh Women Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BWCCI) Engaging Women Entrepreneurs in Pol…
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    Bangladesh Women Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BWCCI)
    Engaging Women Entrepreneurs in Policy Advocacy
    Engaging Women Entrepreneurs in Anti-corruption Efforts
    Center for Excellence in Corporate Governance (CECG), Mexico
    Corporate Sustainability Index
    (view changes)
    1:51 pm
  2. page Women's Empowerment edited ... Having continuous and good relations with policymakers is an effective tool to involve them in…
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    Having continuous and good relations with policymakers is an effective tool to involve them in achieving the target;
    Mutual understanding between initiators and policymakers brings success effectively.
    BWCCI
    Engaging Women Entrepreneurs in Anti-corruption Reform Efforts
    The Problem​:
    Since women often face social, cultural, political and institutional discrimination, it is likely that women will face even more repression in a corruption-ridden society. In Bangladesh, corruption is one of the key impediments to the empowerment of women and one of the central barriers that obstructs the growth of women entrepreneurship.
    The practice:
    BWCCI initiated this program in order to identify the right allies at the policy level and further advocate the formulation of laws and regulations that would help generate a women-friendly business environment free of corruption. Meeting with policy makers was an effective process to bring the locally insoluble common issues of women entrepreneurs to the respective central authority and make them responsive towards undertaking steps for better solutions. By conducting regular meetings with women entrepreneurs and policy makers BWCCI effectively created a new platform from which both parties are able to share and discuss crucial issues of developing women's entrepreneurship. Through the process, female entrepreneurs developed good relationships with bankers, trade license providers, the National Board of Revenue, and journalists. Together the women entrepreneurs and relevant stakeholders were able to discover the roots and depth of corruption in Bangladeshi systems and have come forward to reduce corruption in the business environment.
    In addition to hosting discussions and building relationships, BWCCI built awareness and understanding of business related issues among women entrepreneurs. By holding budget workshops, advocacy training sessions, and seminars on various issues, BWCCI instructed women on how to identify if they are receiving the services to which they are entitled. They also instituted an anti-corruption hotline that women can when they feel they are being denied services because of corruption.
    How and Why BWCCI developed this practice:
    Women in Bangladesh are often marginalized and find themselves without a voice in the democratic process. Because of this they face many barriers to entry when attempting to start and grow a business including cultural and social taboos, regulatory obstacles, and lack of capacity to advocate effectively for change. Still being courageous, when some of them step into the arena of business, corruption holds them back. In 2010, BWCCI conducted a study on “The Impact of Corruption on Women Entrepreneurs" that showed areas of significant corruption faced by women entrepreneurs are:
    Trade license (37%)
    Tax ID Number (33%)
    Utility Payment (25%)
    Access to credit (20%)
    VAT payment (16%).
    Realizing how corruption is having a negative impact on women entrepreneurs, BWCCI has undertaken a project named “Engaging Women Entrepreneurs in Anti-Corruption Reform Efforts” in collaboration with USAID-PROGATI since 2009 to provide women entrepreneurs with the skills and information necessary to avoid corruption and advocate for new policies required to prevent corruption.
    Steps and tips for implementing the practice:
    Analyze the current practices of service providers and research existing policies
    Identify the key policy makers and stakeholders who have influence over policies that need to be addressed
    Create smaller working groups with different stakeholders to concentrate on specific issues
    Ensure there is oversight when it comes to implementing the commitments made by different policy makers
    Results:​
    The Finance Minister committed to establishing women dedicated desks at National Board of Revenue offices and fulfilled his promise
    Several city mayors committed to providing oversight to stamp out corruption in the processing of trade licenses resulting in a reduction in the number of incidents
    The Tax Commissioner of all districts opined to assist directly in processing VAT/tax without corruption
    Members of parliament have given commitment to raise their voice in line with proposals from BWCCI
    All banks and NBFIs have been directed to establish "Women Entrepreneur's Dedicated Desks" to help women with loan processing and other banking issues.
    Lessons learned and challenges faced:
    Identifying key persons/players is vital to making the advocacy effort successful
    Continuous collective initiatives are are very helpful in bringing positive changes in the intended areas
    Maintaining a positive image is a vital tool in persuading policy makers
    Ensuring mutual understanding between initiators and policy makers brings success

    Comment here or visit the Discussion tab at the top of the page.
    [[include component="comments" page="Women's Empowerment" limit="ALL"]]
    (view changes)
    1:49 pm
  3. page Women's Empowerment edited ... The attitude of discouragement and insulation that characterizes most of the women in the loca…
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    The attitude of discouragement and insulation that characterizes most of the women in the local community can be changed, their will to participate in the society’s dynamics can be increased, the mentality regarding women’s place and role in the contemporary society can be updated, and women’s capacity to respond to present challenges should be promoted. The respect towards women’s potential can be imposed only by direct competition and such an approach can open new horizons for the society. Moreover, the project is an expression of equal opportunities for the benefit of the society. Women are a potential economic, social and political power that is not yet fully explored. Every community should highlight their feminine role models for the benefit of the present and upcoming generations.
    ABW
    ...
    Women in Serbia(ABW)Serbia (ABW)
    Girls' Day Serbia 2012
    The problem:
    (view changes)
    8:28 am
  4. page Women's Empowerment edited ... Lessons from the experience: The attitude of discouragement and insulation that characterizes…
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    Lessons from the experience:
    The attitude of discouragement and insulation that characterizes most of the women in the local community can be changed, their will to participate in the society’s dynamics can be increased, the mentality regarding women’s place and role in the contemporary society can be updated, and women’s capacity to respond to present challenges should be promoted. The respect towards women’s potential can be imposed only by direct competition and such an approach can open new horizons for the society. Moreover, the project is an expression of equal opportunities for the benefit of the society. Women are a potential economic, social and political power that is not yet fully explored. Every community should highlight their feminine role models for the benefit of the present and upcoming generations.
    ABW
    Association of Business Women in Serbia(ABW)
    Girls' Day Serbia 2012
    The problem:
    Young women in Serbia are generally well educated and do well in school. However, girls still tend to gravitate disproportionately toward the "typically female" professions, thus leading to an underused pool of talent, missed opportunities for more lucrative career paths, and future economic security for themselves and their families.
    The practice:
    Girls' Day 2012 was envisioned as a pilot to be used as a basis for organizing Girls' Days in following years and to correspond with similar events already implemented in several European countries.
    On April 26, five-hundred 7th and 8th grade girls visited women-owned or managed companies in traditionally "male" fields such as computers/IT, engineering, and science. During the day each girl has a fruitful and stimulating experience that combines mentor shadowing and learning-by-doing opportunities. The girls participate in activities that are typical of the businesswoman's everyday responsibilities with the aim of providing real encounters that will spark interest in the respective field. While the public event took place on one day, ABW spend several months beforehand preparing the girls, teachers, and businesswomen who opened their offices to the visits. Following the event ABW conducted a one month evaluation period in order to see the real impacts and make necessary adjustments for following years.
    Why and How ABW developed this practice:
    Recent research and practive have demonstrated that the education of girls and employment of women are critical to economic development, active civil society, and good governance. Girls' Day was developed with the aim to 1) achieve gender equality in education and 2) contribute to the improvement of the economic status of women. These are two of the six priority areas for Serbia's National Action Plan for Implementation of the National Strategy for the Improvement of the Position of Women and Promotion of Gender Equality, which was adopted in August 2010.
    Steps or tips for implementing the practice:
    It is crucial to have the active involvement of the target group, their educators, local authorities and private sector volunteers. Furthermore, the girls and their mentors can provide the "human interest" stories to attract widespread media coverage at both the local and national levels which can serve as a backdrop against the very real issues of gender equality and economic opportunities in Serbia.
    Essential Steps
    Layout the criteria for selection and identify towns and companies that are interested in participating.
    Draft a working plan for promoting the event through local/national media and print materials
    Send invitation letters to all participants (schools and companies) with recommendations and guidelines of behavior
    Host a briefing session with students, school representatives, and companies to review the aims and objectives of the event as well as their individual responsibilities
    Hold press conferences or similar public events the day of the event to draw more attention.
    Results:
    In addition to representing the first time young girls in Serbia had the opportunity to visit companies and learn about daily operations in non-typical female professions, Girls' Day introduced the opportunity for schools to develop relationships with local companies and business leaders. Combined with the links that have been made with local business associations and chambers of commerce, the way for continued cooperation beyond this project has been paved.
    According to written evaluations administered to the participants of Girls' Day events:
    Approximately 500 young women from 62 schools in 23 towns visited 58 women-owned or managed companies throughout the country.
    70% confirm their interest raised for math, science, engineering and ICT as a personal career option.
    100% of the participating businesswomen assess the action as positive and are interested in its continuation in the upcoming years
    Media coverage exceeded our expectations - over 60 announcements in print, TV, digital media, radio
    _ftnref1
    Lessons learned and challenges faced:
    A major challenge was ensuring the participation of schools and companies. We decided to transform these challenges into success factors by working with our members who are interested in corporate social responsibility and with local coordinators who assisted with the identification, recruitment and selection of schools and companies who would be most engaged to the Girls’ Day concept. This dual approach paid off; over half of the participating businesswomen were members of ABW, and there was a 100% response rate to the letters of invitation, i.e. no companies refused to participate. Further relevant lessons learned include:
    Training sessions for school officials, teachers, pupils, and businesswomen enhanced the Girls’ Day experience for all.
    Social media was key (Facebook page, Youtube videos) and will continue existing communication and PR about this and future events.
    Matching the pupils with businesswomen from their local communities was essential for the Girls’ Day visits and, more importantly, for the sustainability of the project’s impact.

    anchor3
    Bangladesh Women Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BWCCI)
    (view changes)
    8:28 am
  5. page Leading Practices by Organization edited ... Al-Mustakbal Foundation for Strategic and Policy Studies (AMF), Palestine Legislative Reform …
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    Al-Mustakbal Foundation for Strategic and Policy Studies (AMF), Palestine
    Legislative Reform for the Palestinian Economy
    ​Admas Common Affairs Consultancy Association
    Land Reform through Public Private Dialogue

    Association of Business Women and Top Managers in Brasov, Romania
    Femina VIP
    (view changes)
    6:20 am

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